Funding Alert Vol. 29 No. 12 Alert # 1 - December 4, 2018

Texas Department of State Health Services icon Funding Information Center icon Toll free: 1-888-963-7111 ext. 7684 icon Austin phone: (512) 776-7684 icon Fax: (512) 776-7683


The Texas Department of State Health Services Funding Alert is published weekly.  If you wish to subscribe to the Funding Information Center Funding Alert and other services, please call (512) 776-7684 or fill out our online subscription form which can be found at: https://dshs.texas.gov/fic/subscribe.aspx.  Information in the Funding Alert is not copyrighted and may be reproduced. The Texas Department of State Health Services Funding Information Center would appreciate credit for the material used and a copy of the reprint. For information on viewing Adobe Acrobat .pdf and other files, see file viewing information.

Disclaimer: External links to other sites are intended to be informational and do not have the endorsement of the Department of State Health Services. These sites may also not be accessible to persons with disabilities. External e-mail links are provided to you as a courtesy. Please be advised that you are not e-mailing the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) and DSHS policies do not apply should you choose to correspond.


Funding News and Grant Tips

FIC Releases Holiday Funding Alert Schedule
The Funding Information Center will not publish a Funding Alert on December 25 and January 1 due to the holidays. 
We will return to our normal distribution schedule the following week with the January 8, 2019 issue.
Happy Holidays from the Funding Information Center staff!
From the Funding Information Center, 12/3/18icon

Report Warns of Risks of Top-Heavy Philanthropy
The charitable sector in the United States is increasingly top-heavy, with a growing amount of philanthropic power held by a handful of very wealthy individuals and foundations — a trend that poses risks to the sector's effectiveness and independence, a report from the Institute for Policy Studies finds. 
The report, Gilded Giving 2018: Top-Heavy Philanthropy and Its Risks to the Independent Sector, found that the charitable sector is changing from a sector with broad-based support contributed by a wide range of donors to one dominated by a relative handful of individuals at the top of the income and wealth ladder. In 2017, for example, households with income of at least $200,000 accounted for 52 percent of all charitable deductions, compared with 30 percent in the early 2000s. Similarly, the percentage of charitable deductions from households with more than $1 million in income grew from 12 percent in 1995 to 30 percent in 2015. According to the report, the share of all households giving to charity fell from 66 percent in 2000 to 55 percent in 2014, while over the same period the number of low-dollar and mid-level donors — who traditionally have made up the vast majority of charities' supporters — fell by about 2 percent annually.
The study also found a significant increase in the number of mega-gifts awarded in recent years, with the threshold for such gifts jumping from $50 million in 2012 to $300 million in 2017. In 2012, gifts of at least $50 million totaled $1.2 billion and accounted for 0.5 percent of all individual giving in the U.S., while in 2017 gifts of at least $300 million totaled $4.1 billion and accounted for about 1.5 percent of individual giving. In addition, between 2005 and 2015, total assets held in private grantmaking foundations grew more than 60 percent, while contributions to donor-advised funds jumped 66 percent.
The implications for the sector and the health of democratic civil society, the report argues, include increased volatility and unpredictability in funding; a greater emphasis on major donor cultivation; a stronger funding bias toward major-donor-directed boutique organizations and projects (and all that means for mission creep and distortion); an increase in tax-avoidance and self-dealing; the warehousing of wealth in the face of urgent needs; and the increasing use of philanthropy to protect power and privilege. To address these risks, the report's authors call for an increase in the annual payout requirement for private foundations; reforming the rules governing DAFs to require distribution of donations within three years; banning gifts from private foundations to DAFs, and vice-versa; and establishing a universal charitable deduction to encourage giving by low- and middle-income givers.
"Charity is now becoming increasingly undemocratic, with organizations relying more and more on larger donations from smaller numbers of wealthy donors while receiving shrinking amounts of revenue from donors at lower- and middle-income levels," said Helen Flannery, associate fellow at the institute and a co-author of the report.
"There's nothing wrong with wealthy people giving bigger gifts to charitable causes that can improve society," said Josh Hoxie, director of the institute's Project on Opportunity and Taxation. "The problem is the rules regulating our charitable sector have become skewed toward prioritizing tax write-offs for the ultra-wealthy and not toward solving social problems."
From The Foundation Center's Philanthropy News Digest News email, 11/20/18icon

Grants from Donor-Advised Funds Totaled $19.08 Billion in 2017
Grants awarded from Donor-Advised Funds (DAF) in the United States in 2017 totaled a record $19.08 billion, up 19.9 percent from 2016, a report from the National Philanthropic Trust (NPT) finds.
Based on an analysis of data from nearly 1,000 charitable organizations that sponsor DAFs, including national charities, community foundations, and other sponsoring charities, NPT's 2018 Donor-Advised Fund Report found that contributions to DAF accounts increased 16.5 percent, to $29.23 billion, on a year-over-year basis, while total assets available for grantmaking increased 27.3 percent, to $110.01 billion, and the aggregate payout rate rose to 22.1 percent, up from 20.6 percent in 2016, interrupting a downward slide from a high of 24.7 percent in 2010. 
According to the report, DAFs remained the fastest-growing giving vehicle in the U.S. in 2017, with the number of DAF accounts surging 60.2 percent, to 463,622, while the average size of a DAF account fell 20.5 percent, to $237,356, from $298,628 in 2016.
This year, for the first time, the report includes a brief analysis of the types of assets contributed to DAFs. Representing 61.5 percent of the 2017 total, the data set shows that approximately 60 percent of DAF contributions were non-cash assets, with the vast majority of those being publicly traded securities. Contributions of LLC partnership interests also increased, from four percent of all non-cash contributions in 2012 to six percent in 2017.
From The Foundation Center's Philanthropy News Digest News email, 11/20/18icon

Study Finds Giving Circles Becoming More Diverse
The composition of giving circles is becoming more diverse, and newer members are more likely to join because of their desire to engage deeply with a cause or issue, two reports from the Collective Giving Research Group and the Women's Philanthropy Institute at the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy find. 
The first, Giving Circle Membership: How Collective Giving Impacts Donors, found that giving circle members give more money and time, give more strategically, are more engaged in civic and political activities, and have philanthropic networks that are more diverse in terms of race, religion, and socioeconomic status than do non-members. Indeed, compared with established members, who tend to be older, white, higher-income, and married, newer members are more diverse in terms of race, gender, and income levels. According to the study, newer members also are more likely to join out of a desire to engage more deeply with a specific cause or issue and are more likely to prioritize giving in support of social change, whereas established members are more likely to prioritize religious giving. 
Based on a survey of 86 community foundations and public charities, the second report, Dynamics of Hosting Giving Circles, examined the motivations of community foundations and other organizations for hosting giving circles, the services they offer, the costs involved, and the benefits and challenges of doing so. According to the survey, 92 percent of respondents cited wanting to contribute to a culture of philanthropy in their communities as their primary motivation for hosting a giving circle, while 91 percent perceived doing so as a benefit, followed by reaching new donors (81 percent cited as a motivation and 85 percent as a benefit), reaching a more diverse set of donors (74 percent and 64 percent), and increasing the organization's visibility (70 percent and 74 percent). 
The most common services offered by host organizations were acting as a fiscal sponsor so that the giving circle could receive tax-deductible contributions (100 percent), providing communications support (82 percent), organizing educational opportunities for members (73 percent), and soliciting proposals from potential grantees (64 percent). In terms of the challenges associated with hosting, the surveyed foundations cited staff time required, differences in expectations between the giving circle and the foundation, and cost. 
The report also includes profiles of 10 foundations that host giving circles and provides details on their staffing, services, and fees; benefits to the host organization and community; challenges; and lessons learned.
From The Foundation Center's Philanthropy News Digest News email, 11/20/18icon


Public Funding Opportunities

Grants to Expand Substance Abuse Treatment Capacity in Adult Treatment Drug Courts and Adult Tribal Healing to Wellness Courts: TI-19-002
SOURCE: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
APPLICATION DEADLINE: 1/4/19.
$ AVAILABLE: $10 million for 25 awards.
ELIGIBILITY: Eligible applicants are state, local, and tribal governments with direct involvement with the adult treatment drug court/Tribal Healing to Wellness Court, such as: • State governments; the District of Columbia, Guam, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau are also eligible to apply. • Governmental units within political subdivisions of a state, such as a county, city or town, and individual adult treatment drug courts. • Federally recognized American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) tribes, tribal organizations, Urban Indian Organizations, and consortia of tribes or tribal organizations.
PURPOSE: The purpose of this program is to expand substance use disorder (SUD) treatment services in existing adult problem solving courts, and adult Tribal Healing to Wellness courts, which use the treatment drug court model in order to provide SUD treatment (including recovery support services, screening, assessment, case management, and program coordination) to defendants/offenders. 
CFDA: 93.243
CONTACT: Eileen Bermudez, (240) 276-1412, email: FOACSAT@samhsa.hhs.gov. For more information see https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=310160&utm_campaign=fyi_newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_source=govdelivery
From U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Minority Health FYI Weekly Health Resources email, 11/28/18icon
Subject(s) substance abuse treatment

Long-acting Drug Delivery Systems for ART Optimization in HIV-1 Infected Children (R61/R33 Clinical Trial Not Allowed): RFA-AI-18-057 
SOURCE: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
APPLICATION DEADLINE: Letter of Intent: 2/13/19. Application: 3/13/19 by 5 pm local time of applicant organization.
$ AVAILABLE: NIAID intends to commit $3.86 million in FY 2020 to fund three to four awards. 
ELIGIBILITY: * Public/state/private controlled institutions of higher education.
* Hispanic-serving institutions.
* Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs).
* Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs).
* Alaska native and native Hawaiian serving institutions.
* Asian American Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institutions (AANAPISIs).
* Nonprofits with or without 501(c)(3) IRS status (other than institutions of higher education).
* Small businesses.
* For-profit organizations (other than small businesses).
* State governments.
* County governments.
* City or township governments.
* Special district governments.
* Indian/Native American tribal governments (federally recognized and other than federally recognized).
* Eligible agencies of the federal government.
* U.S. territories or possessions.
* Independent school districts.
* Public housing authorities/Indian housing authorities.
* Native American tribal organizations (other than federally recognized tribal governments).
* Faith-based or community-based organizations.
* Regional organizations.
* Non-domestic (non-U.S.) entities (foreign institutions).
PURPOSE: The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to accelerate development of safe and effective long-acting drug delivery systems (LA-DDS) for improved, simplified treatment of HIV-1 in children. This FOA invites applicants engaged in the development of existing LA-DDS platforms at early product development stages to perform specific preclinical activities that enable product optimization and accelerated translation to HIV-1 infected children. Collaborative research partnerships with industry are required. 
CFDA: 93.855
CONTACT: Please see URL for multiple contacts. For more information see https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-AI-18-057.html
From CDC National Prevention Information Network's (NPIN) HIV/Hepatitis/STD/TB Funding Information email, 11/29/18icon
Subject(s) children's health, HIV/AIDS services

Promoting Reductions in Intersectional StigMa (PRISM) to Improve the HIV Prevention Continuum (R34 Clinical Trial Required): RFA-MH-19-410 
SOURCE: National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
APPLICATION DEADLINE: Letter of Intent: 12/23/18. Application: 1/23/19 by 5 pm local time of applicant organization.
$ AVAILABLE: NIH intends to fund an estimate of four to six, corresponding to a total of $2 million in direct costs for fiscal year 2019 to fund this and the companion announcements.
ELIGIBILITY: * Public/state/private controlled institutions of higher education.
* Hispanic-serving institutions.
* Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs).
* Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs).
* Alaska native and native Hawaiian serving institutions.
* Asian American Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institutions (AANAPISIs).
* Nonprofits with or without 501(c)(3) IRS status (other than institutions of higher education).
* Small businesses.
* For-profit organizations (other than small businesses).
* State governments.
* County governments.
* City or township governments.
* Special district governments.
* Indian/Native American tribal governments (federally recognized and other than federally recognized).
* Eligible agencies of the federal government.
* U.S. territories or possessions.
* Independent school districts.
* Public housing authorities/Indian housing authorities.
* Native American tribal organizations (other than federally recognized tribal governments).
* Faith-based or community-based organizations.
* Regional organizations.
* Non-domestic (non-U.S.) entities (foreign institutions).
PURPOSE: This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) solicits research grant applications which will: 1) advance measurements of intersectional stigma (multiple stigmatized identities) and examine the mechanisms and pathways by which it is a barrier to HIV testing and linkage to prevention; or 2) develop and test interventions to reduce intersectional stigma and improve the uptake of HIV testing and linkage to ongoing HIV prevention among key populations at substantial risk for HIV infection.
CFDA: 93.242 
CONTACT: Please see URL for multiple contacts. For more information see https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-MH-19-410.html
From CDC National Prevention Information Network's (NPIN) HIV/Hepatitis/STD/TB Funding Information email, 11/29/18icon
Subject(s) HIV/AIDS education/prevention

Promoting Reductions in Intersectional StigMa (PRISM) to Improve the HIV Prevention Continuum (R21 Clinical Trial Optional): RFA-MH-19-411 
SOURCE: National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD)
APPLICATION DEADLINE: Letter of Intent: 12/23/18. Application: 1/23/19 by 5 pm local time of applicant organization.
$ AVAILABLE: NIH intends to fund an estimate of six to nine awards, corresponding to a total of $3 million in direct costs for fiscal year 2019 to fund this and the companion announcements.
ELIGIBILITY: * Public/state/private controlled institutions of higher education.
* Hispanic-serving institutions.
* Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs).
* Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs).
* Alaska native and native Hawaiian serving institutions.
* Asian American Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institutions (AANAPISIs).
* Nonprofits with or without 501(c)(3) IRS status (other than institutions of higher education).
* Small businesses.
* For-profit organizations (other than small businesses).
* State governments.
* County governments.
* City or township governments.
* Special district governments.
* Indian/Native American tribal governments (federally recognized and other than federally recognized).
* Eligible agencies of the federal government.
* U.S. territories or possessions.
* Independent school districts.
* Public housing authorities/Indian housing authorities.
* Native American tribal organizations (other than federally recognized tribal governments).
* Faith-based or community-based organizations.
* Regional organizations.
* Non-domestic (non-U.S.) entities (foreign institutions).
PURPOSE: This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) solicits research grant applications which will: 1) advance measurements of intersectional stigma (multiple stigmatized identities) and examine the mechanisms and pathways by which it is a barrier to HIV testing and linkage to prevention; or 2) develop and test interventions to reduce intersectional stigma and improve the uptake of HIV testing and linkage to ongoing HIV prevention among key populations at substantial risk for HIV infection.
CFDA: 93.242, 93.307 
CONTACT: Please see URL for multiple contacts. For more information see https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-MH-19-411.html
From CDC National Prevention Information Network's (NPIN) HIV/Hepatitis/STD/TB Funding Information email, 11/29/18icon
Subject(s) HIV/AIDS education/prevention

Promoting Reductions in Intersectional StigMa (PRISM) to Improve the HIV Prevention Continuum (R01 Clinical Trial Optional): RFA-MH-19-412 
SOURCE: National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD)
APPLICATION DEADLINE: Letter of Intent: 12/23/18. Application: 1/23/19 by 5 pm local time of applicant organization.
$ AVAILABLE: NIH intends to fund an estimate of four to six, corresponding to a total of $2 million in direct costs for fiscal year 2019 to fund this and the companion announcements.
ELIGIBILITY: * Public/state/private controlled institutions of higher education.
* Hispanic-serving institutions.
* Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs).
* Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs).
* Alaska native and native Hawaiian serving institutions.
* Asian American Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institutions (AANAPISIs).
* Nonprofits with or without 501(c)(3) IRS status (other than institutions of higher education).
* Small businesses.
* For-profit organizations (other than small businesses).
* State governments.
* County governments.
* City or township governments.
* Special district governments.
* Indian/Native American tribal governments (federally recognized and other than federally recognized).
* Eligible agencies of the federal government.
* U.S. territories or possessions.
* Independent school districts.
* Public housing authorities/Indian housing authorities.
* Native American tribal organizations (other than federally recognized tribal governments).
* Faith-based or community-based organizations.
* Regional organizations.
* Non-domestic (non-U.S.) entities (foreign institutions).
PURPOSE: This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) solicits research grant applications which will: 1) advance measurements of intersectional stigma (multiple stigmatized identities) and examine the mechanisms and pathways by which it is a barrier to HIV testing and linkage to prevention; or 2) develop and test interventions to reduce intersectional stigma and improve the uptake of HIV testing and linkage to ongoing HIV prevention among key populations at substantial risk for HIV infection.
CFDA: 93.242, 93.307 
CONTACT: Please see URL for multiple contacts. For more information see https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-MH-19-412.html
From CDC National Prevention Information Network's (NPIN) HIV/Hepatitis/STD/TB Funding Information email, 11/29/18icon
Subject(s) HIV/AIDS education/prevention

Rural Communities Opioid Response Program - Planning: HRSA-19-081
SOURCE: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)
APPLICATION DEADLINE: 1/15/19.
$ AVAILABLE: $24 million for 120 awards.
ELIGIBILITY: Eligible applicants include all domestic public or private, nonprofit or for-profit, entities, including faith-based and community-based organizations, tribes, and tribal organizations, who will serve rural communities at the highest risk for substance use disorder.
PURPOSE: This notice solicits applications for the Rural Communities Opioid Response Program- Planning (RCORP-Planning). The purpose of RCORP-Planning is to support treatment for and prevention of substance use disorder, including opioid use disorder (OUD), in rural counties at the highest risk for substance use disorder. 
CFDA: 93.912
CONTACT: Kiley Diop, (301) 443-6666, email: kdiop@hrsa.gov. For more information see https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=307936&utm_campaign=fyi_newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_source=govdelivery
From U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Minority Health FYI Weekly Health Resources email, 11/21/18icon
Subject(s) rural health, substance abuse education/prevention, substance abuse treatment

Strategies to Provide Culturally Tailored Palliative and End-of-Life Care for Seriously Ill American Indian and Alaska Native Individuals (R01 Clinical Trial Optional): PAR-19-057
SOURCE: National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR)
APPLICATION DEADLINE: Please see URL for deadlines. Expires 1/8/22.
$ AVAILABLE: The number of awards is contingent upon NIH appropriations and the submission of a sufficient number of meritorious applications. 
ELIGIBILITY: * Public/state/private controlled institutions of higher education.
* Hispanic-serving institutions.
* Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs).
* Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs).
* Alaska native and native Hawaiian serving institutions.
* Asian American Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institutions (AANAPISIs).
* Nonprofits with or without 501(c)(3) IRS status (other than institutions of higher education).
* Small businesses.
* For-profit organizations (other than small businesses).
* State governments.
* County governments.
* City or township governments.
* Special district governments.
* Indian/Native American tribal governments (federally recognized and other than federally recognized).
* Eligible agencies of the federal government.
* U.S. territories or possessions.
* Independent school districts.
* Public housing authorities/Indian housing authorities.
* Native American tribal organizations (other than federally recognized tribal governments).
* Faith-based or community-based organizations.
* Regional organizations.
* Non-domestic (non-U.S.) entities (foreign institutions).
PURPOSE: The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to encourage research that will improve and increase the use of evidence-based interventions in end-of-life and palliative care (EOLPC) for American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) individuals with advanced illness and their families and communities.
CFDA: 93.361
CONTACT: Please see URL for multiple contacts. For more information see https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-19-057.html
From U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Minority Health FYI Weekly Health Resources email, 11/28/18icon
Subject(s) medical research, minority health

Strategies to Provide Culturally Tailored Palliative and End-of-Life Care for Seriously Ill American Indian and Alaska Native Individuals (R21 Clinical Trial Optional): PAR-19-058
SOURCE: National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR)
APPLICATION DEADLINE: Please see URL for deadlines. Expires 1/8/22.
$ AVAILABLE: The number of awards is contingent upon NIH appropriations and the submission of a sufficient number of meritorious applications. 
ELIGIBILITY: * Public/state/private controlled institutions of higher education.
* Hispanic-serving institutions.
* Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs).
* Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs).
* Alaska native and native Hawaiian serving institutions.
* Asian American Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institutions (AANAPISIs).
* Nonprofits with or without 501(c)(3) IRS status (other than institutions of higher education).
* Small businesses.
* For-profit organizations (other than small businesses).
* State governments.
* County governments.
* City or township governments.
* Special district governments.
* Indian/Native American tribal governments (federally recognized and other than federally recognized).
* Eligible agencies of the federal government.
* U.S. territories or possessions.
* Independent school districts.
* Public housing authorities/Indian housing authorities.
* Native American tribal organizations (other than federally recognized tribal governments).
* Faith-based or community-based organizations.
* Regional organizations.
* Non-domestic (non-U.S.) entities (foreign institutions).
PURPOSE: The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to encourage research that will improve and increase the use of evidence-based interventions in end-of-life and palliative care (EOLPC) for American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) individuals with advanced illness and their families and communities.
CFDA: 93.361
CONTACT: Please see URL for multiple contacts. For more information see https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-19-058.html
From U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Minority Health FYI Weekly Health Resources email, 11/28/18icon
Subject(s) medical research, minority health

Surveillance for Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) and Other Viral Respiratory Infections Among Native Americans/Alaska Natives: RFA-IP-19-001 
SOURCE: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
APPLICATION DEADLINE: 2/1/19.
$ AVAILABLE: $5 million for one award.
ELIGIBILITY: * County governments.
* Special district governments.
* Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education.
* Nonprofits that do not have a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education.
* State governments.
* Native American tribal governments (federally recognized).
* Native American tribal organizations (other than federally recognized tribal governments).
* Private institutions of higher education.
* Independent school districts.
* Public and State controlled institutions of higher education.
* City or township governments.
* Public housing authorities/Indian housing authorities.
PURPOSE: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading viral cause of lower respiratory tract infection including bronchiolitis and pneumonia in infants and children worldwide. The annual rate of RSV hospitalizations for children less than 2 years of age in the US is 5.2 per 1,000, but substantially higher among Native Americans. There are currently approximately 40 vaccines or antibody products in development designed to prevent RSV infections. With potential licensure of these products on the horizon, it will be important to establish baseline estimates of the burden of RSV infections in high-risk populations, like Native Americans, and to maintain surveillance post-licensure in order to evaluate impact. Native Americans are also at higher risk for severe respiratory infections associated with human metapneumovirus (HMPV) and other viruses, which will also be monitored through this system.
CFDA: 93.185
CONTACT: Amy Yang, email: vdz9@cdc.gov. For more information see https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=308248&utm_campaign=fyi_newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_source=govdelivery
From U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Minority Health FYI Weekly Health Resources email, 11/21/18icon
Subject(s) children's health, medical research
 
Tribal Behavioral Health Grant Program: SM-19-005 
SOURCE: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
APPLICATION DEADLINE: 1/4/19.
$ AVAILABLE: $12,797,090 for 51 awards.
ELIGIBILITY: Eligibility is limited to federally recognized American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) tribes, tribal organizations, Urban Indian Organizations, or consortia of tribes and tribal organizations.
PURPOSE: The purpose of this program is to prevent and reduce suicidal behavior and substance use, reduce the impact of trauma, and promote mental health among American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth through the age of 24 years. 
CFDA: 93.243
CONTACT: Eileen Bermudez, (240) 276-1412, email: FOACSAT@samhsa.hhs.gov. For more information see https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=310140&utm_campaign=fyi_newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_source=govdelivery
From U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Minority Health FYI Weekly Health Resources email, 11/28/18icon
Subject(s) minority health, substance abuse education/prevention, suicide prevention


Private Funding Opportunities

A Kids' Brain Tumor Cure Accepting LOIs for PLGA Tumor Research
SOURCE: A Kids Brain Tumor Cure Foundation 
APPLICATION DEADLINE: Investigators from all over the world are invited to submit an LOI at any point during the year. Upon review, selected applicants will be invited to submit a full proposal.
$ AVAILABLE: Grant amount is based on size, impact, and complexity of project, and funding can be awarded over a one-, two-, or three-year period.
ELIGIBILITY: Investigators in the early years of their career are encouraged to apply.
PURPOSE: A Kids Brain Tumor Cure Foundation was founded in 2007 by a group of dedicated parents, physicians, and friends to improve the treatment, quality of life, and long-term outlook for children with brain tumors.
The number-one priority of the foundation is to encourage researchers who are ready to turn their attention to the area of pediatric low-grade glioma (PLGA) tumors and award research grants for the most promising programs and studies. It is hoped that the research will lead to a better understanding of the causes of PLGA as well as the discovery of more effective treatments and a cure for the most common forms of children's brain tumors.
To that end, the foundation is accepting Letters of Intent related to basic and translational projects with the potential to advance understanding of the underlying biology of the development and treatment of PLGA tumors. 
CONTACT: Please see URL for contact information. For more information see https://akidsbraintumorcure.org/medical-research-on-childhood-brain-tumors/apply-for-a-plga-sponsored-grant/
From The Foundation Center's Philanthropy News Digest web site, accessed 11/29/18icon
Subject(s) cancer research, children's health

American Psychological Foundation Issues RFP for 2019 Esther Katz Rosen Pre-College Psychology Grant Program
SOURCE: American Psychological Foundation (APF)
APPLICATION DEADLINE: 3/1/19.
$ AVAILABLE: Grants of up to $25,000. 
ELIGIBILITY: To be eligible, applicants must be an educational institution, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, or individual affiliated with a qualifying institution.
PURPOSE: The American Psychological Foundation, the charitable arm of the American Psychological Association, has issued a Request for Proposals for the 2019 Esther Katz Rosen Pre-College Psychology Grant Program.
Through the program, grants of up to $25,000 will be awarded in support of efforts aimed at improving the quality of education in psychological science and its application in secondary schools for high-ability students. Projects must focus on supplying education for gifted and talented high school students.
CONTACT: Please see URL for contact information. For more information see https://www.apa.org/apf/funding/rosen-precollege.aspx
From The Foundation Center's Philanthropy News Digest web site, accessed 11/29/18icon
Subject(s) medical research

Healthy Smiles, Healthy Children Invites Proposals for Access to Care Grants
SOURCE: American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry
APPLICATION DEADLINE: 12/21/18.
$ AVAILABLE: Grants of up to $20,000. 
ELIGIBILITY: To be eligible, applicants must be a United States-based nonprofit or local government agency that provides dental services to children in the U.S. or a U.S. territory. Projects should have pediatric dentist involvement. If a pediatric dentist is not participating, a general dentist must be involved for funding consideration. In addition, applicants must have matching funds equal to the grant request amount at the time the application is submitted. Matching funds can either be cash or in-kind.
PURPOSE: The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry established Healthy Smiles, Healthy Children (HSHC) in 1987 with the aim of providing dental care for all children in the United States. Since 2010, HSHC has awarded more than $4.6 million in grants and commitments to 81 organizations in 32 states and the District of Columbia, enabling them to provide Dental Homes to more than 320,000 children.
HSHC currently is accepting proposals from pediatric dental care organizations for its Access to Care Grants program.
Through the program, HSHC will award single-year grants of up to $20,000 in support of community-based initiatives that provide dental care to underserved children. Priority will be given to initiatives that support dental visits at age one; emphasize care for pediatric patients from birth to age 5; provide care to special-needs patients; address the needs of specific underserved demographic groups; and/or incorporate systemic health (i.e., diabetes, cancer, etc.).
Funds may be applied to cover the cost of clinic supplies and instruments, patient/parent education materials, take-home supplies (toothbrushes, toothpaste, etc.), education and/or outreach to recruit dentists to the program, and/or other activities with clear, direct impact on pediatric oral health care.
CONTACT: None.
From The Foundation Center's Philanthropy News Digest web site, accessed 11/29/18icon
Subject(s) children's health, dental health

Kelly Brush Foundation Invites Applications for Adaptive Sports Equipment
SOURCE: Kelly Brush Foundation 
APPLICATION DEADLINE: 3/17/19.
$ AVAILABLE: While the foundation does not have a minimum or maximum award amount, grants rarely exceed $5,000 and the average grant is generally around $2,500.
The funds must support the purchase of sport and recreation equipment from the common (handcycles, monoskis, sport chairs, etc.) to the less typical (scuba equipment, bowling ramps, equestrian saddles).
ELIGIBILITY: To be eligible, applicants must be living in the United States and must supply the foundation with information about their spinal cord injury, details on their source of income, and a description of the type of equipment they hope to purchase.
PURPOSE: The Kelly Brush Foundation strives to empower those with paralysis to lead engaged and fulfilling lives through sport and recreation and to prevent ski racing injuries through a shared commitment to proper safety practices.
The foundation's Adaptive Sports Grant program awards grants for the purchase of adaptive sports equipment for recreation and competition alike, with preference given to those applicants who demonstrate a desire to achieve an active lifestyle but have financial limitations. Grants will be awarded to individuals with paralysis due to a spinal cord injury to increase participation in adaptive sports and recreation activities and improve their quality of life.
The program does not support applicants with spina bifida, transverse myelitis, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, post-polio, Guillain-Barre-Strohl Syndrome, ALS, other neuropathies, or other conditions causing disability.
CONTACT: Please see URL for contact information. For more information see https://kellybrushfoundation.org/theactivefund/
From The Foundation Center's Philanthropy News Digest web site, accessed 11/29/18icon
Subject(s) disabilities, health promotion/wellness

Parkinson's Disease Foundation Invites Applications for Mentored Research
SOURCE: Parkinson's Disease Foundation 
APPLICATION DEADLINE: 1/18/19.
$ AVAILABLE: A single grant of $50,000. 
ELIGIBILITY: To be eligible, applicants should be a clinician or scientist within five years of having completed his or her formal training. Fellows may apply.
PURPOSE: The Parkinson's Disease Foundation is inviting applications from new investigators for its PDF-PSG Mentored Clinical Research Award.
A single grant of $50,000 will be awarded to a one-year project in patient-oriented research in Parkinson’s disease or other Parkinsonian disorders under the mentorship of an experienced investigator. The goal of the award is to provide funding for an investigator who has the potential to become an independent researcher.
CONTACT: Please see URL for contact information. For more information see http://parkinson.org/research/Grant-Opportunities/Partnership-Awards
From The Foundation Center's Philanthropy News Digest web site, accessed 11/29/18icon
Subject(s) medical research

Thrasher Research Fund Invites Concept Papers for Early Career Grants
SOURCE: Thrasher Research Fund 
APPLICATION DEADLINE: Concept papers must be received no later than 3/12/19. Upon review, selected applicants will be invited to submit a full proposal by 4/26/19.
$ AVAILABLE: Grants of up to $25,000. 
ELIGIBILITY: The program is open to physicians who are in a residency/fellowship training program, or who have completed such a program no more than a year before the date of submission of their concept paper, as well as postdoctoral researchers who received their doctoral-level degree no more than three years prior to the date of submission of a concept paper.
PURPOSE: The Thrasher Research Fund provides grants for clinical, hypothesis-driven research that offers substantial promise for meaningful advances in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of children's diseases, particularly research with broad-based applications.
The fund is inviting concept papers for its Early Career Awards Grants program. Through the program, the fund will award small grants of up to $25,000 to help early-career researchers gain a foothold in the area of pediatric research. While the program will consider a variety of research topics important to children's health, priority will be given to applicants who show great potential to impact their field of children's health through medical research. Both an applicant's aptitude and inclination toward research will be considered.
CONTACT: None.
From The Foundation Center's Philanthropy News Digest web site, accessed 11/29/18icon
Subject(s) children's health, medical research


Events

The Department of Labor’s New Payroll Audit Independent Determination (PAID) Program 
SPONSOR: Center for Nonprofit Studies at Austin Community College
WHEN: December 17, 10 am to noon.
WHERE: ACC Eastview Campus, 3401 Webberville Road, Room 8500 - Bldg. 8000, (Austin, TX). 
DESCRIPTION: Helping more employees receive back wages—faster
The U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division (WHD) has announced a new nationwide pilot, the Payroll Audit Independent Determination (PAID) program, which facilitates resolution of potential overtime and minimum wage violations under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). The program’s primary objectives are to resolve such claims quickly and without litigation, to improve employers’ compliance with overtime and minimum wage obligations, and to ensure that more employees receive the back wages they are owed—faster.
At times, employers may be the first to uncover violations of overtime or minimum wage laws. Many employers prefer to correct their mistakes and voluntarily pay their employees the wages they are owed. Fearing full-scale federal investigations or costly litigation, employers may choose not to address the violations at all—resulting in losses to employees, employers, and taxpayers.
Purpose of the program:
The primary goals of the PAID program are identifying and correcting non-compliant practices so employees receive 100 percent of their back wages due. To that end, the PAID program will require employers to review their pay practices, accept compliance assistance, and correct the practices that led to the errors. WHD expects that many more employers will self-report and, as a result, that many more employees will be paid more quickly.
COST: Free.
CONTACT: Center for Nonprofit Studies at Austin Community College, (512) 223-7080.
From Center for Nonprofit Studies at Austin Community College email, 11/28/18icon

Webinar - Start the New Year with a Monthly Giving Campaign
SPONSOR: CD Publications 
WHEN: December 13, noon to 1 pm.
WHERE: Webinar.
DESCRIPTION: Find out how to say goodbye to the New Year lull in donations in this enlightening webinar by nonprofit fundraising expert Shiree Skinner. Skinner will share the best practices of how to use the first quarter of the year to cultivate monthly donors. She will walk you through the ways of asking a donor, who, for example, gave $25 in December, to give $25 each month starting in the New Year, thereby turning that $25 donor into a $300 donor!
After attending this webinar, you will be ready to kick-off a monthly giving campaign that starts in January 2019! Therefore, instead of the first quarter being a slow time, you will gain monthly donors who will make a year-long commitment to your organization.
COST: $129.
CONTACT: CD Publications, (855) 237-1396, email: info@cdpublications.com
From CD Publications email, 11/21/18icon

Webinar - HIPAA and Social Media – Understanding and Mitigating Compliance Risks with New Communication Technologies
SPONSOR: SkillAcquire
WHEN: December 13, noon to 1 pm.
WHERE: Webinar.
DESCRIPTION: The Internet and social media such as Facebook and Linked-In have changed the way people communicate and have introduced new risks into the process of providing health care services, and HIPAA Covered Entities now face difficult choices as social networking sites become a preferred means of communication for many, and run the risk of breaches, rule violations, and fines in the event of mishandling of PHI using these new technologies.
New technologies present new challenges to health care providers, as there are simultaneously new requirements to share information with patients, and a new enforcement effort to ensure the privacy and security of Protected Health Information (PHI). 
The session will discuss the requirements, the risks, and the issues of the increasing use of social networking for patient communications, and provide a road map for how to use it safely and effectively, to increase the quality of health care and patient satisfaction.
COST: $249.
CONTACT: SkillAcquire, (302) 444-0162. 
From SkillAcquire email, 11/23/18icon

Webinar - Are Your Policies & Procedures Aligned with the Uniform Guidance? 
SPONSOR: Thompson Grants 
WHEN: December 13, noon to 1:30 pm.
WHERE: Webinar.
DESCRIPTION: The uniform guidance requires federal grant recipients and subrecipients to have a wide range of written policies and procedures in place. Unfortunately, grantees may not understand all the areas in which policies and procedures are now required, or the updated language OMB auditors will expect to see. 
What about your own policies and procedures? Have you covered all the bases? Are they appropriate for your specific organization? Is the way they are written up to date and aligned with the uniform guidance? Are you following correct procedures for updating and maintaining them? 
With compliance—and your stewardship of federal funds—on the line, this is no time for guesswork. Let a federal grants expert help make sure you have the right policies and procedures to meet the OMB’s higher expectations.
COST: Live: $249.
CONTACT: Thompson Grants, (800) 677-3789, email: service@thompson.com.
From Thompson Grants email, 11/28/18icon


returnReturn to Alert

Last updated July 25, 2019