Research Rounds Home

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Research Rounds Learning Objectives:

  • Analyze public health research hypotheses, methodologies, and findings.
  • Describe how research findings advance the practice of public health.
  • Engage in a multi-disciplinary discussion of Texas public health research.

Welcome to DSHS Research Rounds! 

“To him who devotes his life to science, nothing can give more happiness than increasing the number of discoveries, but his cup of joy is full when the results of his studies immediately find practical applications.” –Louis Pasteur

The Texas Department of State Health Services has created a new summer educational series entitled DSHS Research Rounds.  The purpose of this program is to encourage the adoption of public health research into practice and foster a Texas Learning Community around research and best practices.  This series will highlight the work of Texas public health researchers and will illustrate how their work has been or can be translated into practice.

This series will give public health professionals an opportunity to share their research for the benefit of practitioners. Practitioners will learn from Texas researchers about the literature and evidence supporting best practices in public health. 

Outline of Series:

Each session will be 90 minutes and will feature three research projects. Each project will present for 25 minutes, followed by a 5 minute Q&A session.

Summer 2017 Dates:

All presentations are free and are held on Wednesdays from 11:00 am to 12:30 pm, Central Time, in Austin or via webinar.

The Summer presentations will be held in the M100 Conference Room, located in the Moreton building at 1100 W. 49th Street (see map).  

Questions? E-mail researchrounds@dshs.texas.gov

  



June 28 Presentations 

All over the Map: Ensuring a Geographically Robust Primary Care Workforce

turner, matthew 
Matthew P. Turner, PhD, MPH

campbell, catherine
Catherine Campbell, MPH
lauer, pamela
Pamela Lauer, MPH

Authors and Presenters: 
Matthew P. Turner, PhD, MPH 
Catherine Campbell, MPH
Pamela Lauer, MPH
Texas Department of State Health Services, Center for Health Statistics

Description: A robust, highly-trained primary care workforce is imperative to meeting the health needs of Texas’ quickly growing population. In addition to considerable current and future statewide provider shortages, it is essential to address the geographic maldistribution of Texas’ primary care workforce. This research quantifies the extent of the shortage in the state and shows how it differentially impacts different regions. This knowledge is used to inform policy aimed at higher education, health workforce planning programs, and the even the structure of care delivery.

Comparison of Statewide Worksite Lactation Support Recognition Initiatives in the US by State

reat, amanda
Amanda Reat, MS, RD

Presenter:
Amanda Reat, MS, RD
Michael & Susan Dell Center for Healthy Living, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, School of Public Health in Austin

Authors:
Amanda Reat, MS, RD1, Krystin Matthews, MPH1, Kelsey Herron, MPH1, Alma Carver, MS1, Julie Stagg, MSN, RN, IBCLC, RLC2, Courtney Byrd-Williams, PhD1

1. Michael & Susan Dell Center for Healthy Living, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, School of Public Health in Austin 2. Texas Dept. of State Health Services.

Description:
Mothers commonly report that returning to work is a barrier to initiating and continuing breastfeeding. A supportive work environment can help a woman to reach her breastfeeding goals. In some states, there are state-wide initiatives to recognize employers who provide support to breastfeeding employees. This study used interviews with key-informants to identify and compare state-wide worksite recognition initiatives in the states in the US. Half of the states have an initiative to recognize employers who support breastfeeding employees and the characteristics of the initiatives vary. Current efforts to use the research to advance public health practice include facilitating cross-state collaboration and sharing of best practices, including practical tools, communication strategies, and lessons learned between states to promote support for breastfeeding mothers in the workplace.

The Effect of Nutrition on Chronic Diseases

broadstreet, liz
Liz Broadstreet, PhD


Author and Presenter:
Liz Broadstreet, PhD
Texas Department of State Health Services, Public Health Service Region 1, Lubbock

Description:
Chronic diseases now top the list as the leading causes of death in the US as compared to the early 1900’s when infectious diseases ranked as number one. This study sought to determine attitudes, beliefs, and challenges regarding healthy food choices faced by adult citizens, ages 18-65, in rural and border counties in the state of Texas, and correlated the findings to ethnicity, age, and income levels. The Health Belief Model was integrated, specifically the “perceived barrier” component, into a 20-question survey which identified influencing factors in making those decisions. An educational program entitled L1FE was developed as a part of the research project and now serves as an evidence-based practice.
         

      1.5 Continuing Education Credits/Contact Hours Available for the Following (live event only):

      • AMA PRA Category 1 Credits
      • Continuing Nursing Education
      • Certified Health Education Specialists and Master-Certified Health Education Specialists 
      • Registered Dietitians
      • Registered Sanitarians
      • Social Workers

      A certificate of attendance is available for those not seeking the credits/contact hours listed above.

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      July 26 Presentations

      Midwifery and Water Birth: A Survey of Infection Control Practices and State Guideline Utilization

      cervantes, diana
      Diana Cervantes, MS, DrPH 
      Christopher Dieyi, BS
      Christopher Dieyi, BS
      Presenters:

      Diana Cervantes, MS, DrPH 
      Texas Department of State Health Services
      Christopher Dieyi, BS
      The University of North Texas Health Science Center, School of Public Health

      Authors:

      Authors: Christopher Dieyi, BS1, Thi Dang, MPH2, Diana Cervantes, MS, DrPH2

      1. The University of North Texas Health Science Center, School of Public Health 2. Texas Dept. of State Health Services 

      Description:
      In January 2014, the first documented legionellosis death in the United States associated with water birth was investigated by The Texas Department of State Health Services. Public health investigation which included a survey of licensed, certified professional midwives in Texas revealed a need for standards in provider training and education, patient awareness as well as standards for infection control procedures including documentation.

      In 2015, statewide guidelines for water birth were established by the Texas Midwifery Board. These guidelines were based on the recommendation of DSHS epidemiologists, midwives and public members. As a follow-up, this study aimed to assess the awareness and implementation of the newly established guidelines by describing the education, experience and training relevant to infection control practices for water birth, quantify water birth utilization and describing infection prevention measures implemented for water birth in various setting by direct entry midwives.

      Additional Reading:

      1. Fritschel, E., Sanyal, K., Threadgill, H., Cervantes, D. (2015). Fatal legionellosis after water birth, Texas, USA, 2014. Emerg Infect Dis, 21(1), 130-2.
      2. Yu, V.L., Lee, T.C. (2010). Neonatal legionellosis: the tip of the iceberg for pediatric hospital-acquired pneumonia? Pediatr Infect Dis J, 29(3), 282-4.
      3. Phin, N., Cresswell, T., Parry-Ford, F., Incident Control Team. (2014). Case of Legionnaires disease in a neonate following a home birth in a heated birthing pool, England, June 2014. Euro Surveill. 19(29), pii. 20857.
      4. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Committee on Obstetric Practice. (2016). Committee Opinion: Immersion in water during labor and delivery. Number 679, November 2016. Accessed 7/7/2017 at https://www.acog.org/-/media/Committee-Opinions/Committee-on-Obstetric-Practice/co679.pdf?dmc=1&ts=20170707T1954550593
      5. American College of Nurse-Midwives American College of Nurse-Midwives’ Statement Regarding the new ACOG/AAP Committee Opinion, “Immersion in Water During Labor and Delivery. October 26, 2016. Accessed 7/7/2017 at http://www.midwife.org/ACNM-Water-Birth-Statement.  

      Exploring the Determinants of Childhood Severe Obesity in Low-income, Ethnically Diverse Children: The TX CORD Study

      Meliha Salahuddin, PhD, MBBS
      Meliha Salahuddin, PhD, MBBS
      Presenter:

      Meliha Salahuddin, PhD, MBBS
      Michael & Susan Dell Center for Healthy Living, The University of Texas Health Science Center School of Public Health in Austin

      Authors:
      Meliha Salahuddin, PhD, MBBS1,2, Adriana Perez, PhD1,2, Nalini Ranjit, PhD1,2, Steven H. Kelder, PhD1,2, Nancy F. Butte, PhD3, Deanna M. Hoelscher, PhD1,2

      1. Michael & Susan Dell Center for Healthy Living 2. The University of Texas Health Science Center School of Public Health in Austin 3. Baylor College of Medicine

      Description:
      Severe obesity afflicts between 4% and 6% of all youth in the United States, and the prevalence is increasing. Severe obesity can result in serious immediate and long-term cardiovascular, metabolic, and other health consequences. The objective of this study was to assess the associations of child’s early-life (large-for-gestational-age (LGA) and predominant breastfeeding at least 4 months), maternal (morbid obesity), and child’s behavioral (diet, physical activity, screen time) factors with severe obesity (%BMIp95≥120%) in low-income, ethnically diverse children with overweight, obesity and severe obesity, aged 2-12 years who participated in the Texas Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (TX CORD) - secondary prevention randomized controlled trial (RCT) study, 2012-2014.

         

      1.5 Continuing Education Credits/Contact Hours Available for the Following (live event only):

      • AMA PRA Category 1 Credits
      • Continuing Nursing Education
      • Certified Health Education Specialists and Master-Certified Health Education Specialists 
      • Registered Sanitarians
      • Social Workers

      A certificate of attendance is available for those not seeking the credits/contact hours listed above.

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      Last updated July 20, 2017