• Grand Rounds contact:
    grandrounds@dshs.texas.gov


    Continuing Education contact:
    ce.service@dshs.texas.gov 

     

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Fall 2017 Semester

The Fall 2017 semester of Grand Rounds will begin on Wednesday, October 4, 2017. The presentations are free, from 11:00 am to 12:30 pm, Central Time, in Austin (M100 Conference Room at 1100 W. 49th Street, see map) or via webinar.

If you have a disability and need accommodations for this event, please contact us one week before the event so we may arrange for accommodations.

Questions? E-mail grandrounds@dshs.texas.gov


Upcoming Presentations:

October 4: Population Health: Successes and Challenges
October 11: Foodborne Illness Investigations in Texas: Keeping Food “Safe for Our Plates” 
October 18: Preventing Opioid Misuse: A Public Health Approach
October 25: Public Health and the Texas-Mexico Border  **In M653 Conference Room**
November 1: Ethical Issues in Public Health Surveillance: Understanding and Applying the World Health Organization (WHO) Guidelines
November 8: Understanding Childhood Traumatic Stress in the Wake of Hurricane Harvey 


lakey, david 
David Lakey, MD

Chief Medical Officer and Associate Vice Chancellor, 
Department of Population Health, University of Texas System



 

 Population Health: Successes and Challenges

Population Health: Successes and Challenges 

Presenter:
David Lakey, MD

Chief Medical Officer and Associate Vice Chancellor, Department of Population Health, University of Texas System 

Description:
Please join David Lakey, MD, Chief Medical Officer, Associate Vice Chancellor, Department of Population Health, University of Texas System and former DSHS Commissioner for an intriguing discussion of the successes and challenges of population health, including case studies from the University of Texas System, Department of Population Health.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the concept and history of population health.
  • Discuss case studies in population health.
  • Examine the skills and tools needed to effectively deal with emerging population health issues. 

1.5 Continuing Education Credits/Contact Hours Available for the Following (live event only):

  • AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM
  • Continuing Nursing Education
  • Certified Health Education Specialists & Master-Certified Health Education Specialists 
  • Registered Sanitarians
  • Social Worker

A certificate of attendance is available for those not seeking the credits/contact hours listed above.

Suggested Resources:

  1. Casey JA, Schwartz BS, Stewart WF, Adler NE. Using electronic health records for population health research: a review of methods and applications. Annu Rev Public Health. 2016;37:61-81.
  2. Hacker K, Walker DK. Achieving population health in accountable care organizations. Am J Public Health. 2013 Jul;103(7):1163-7. 
  3. Kindig DA. Understanding population health terminology. Milbank Q. 2007;85(1):139-61.
  4. Krieger N. Who and what is a "population"? Historical debates, current controversies, and implications for understanding "population health" and rectifying health inequities. Milbank Q. 2012 Dec;90(4):634-81. 
  5. Woolf SH, Purnell JQ, Simon SM, Zimmerman EB, Camberos GJ, Haley A, Fields RP. Translating evidence into population health improvement: strategies and barriers. Annu Rev Public Health. 2015 Mar 18;36:463-82. 
  6. Zenzano T, Allan JD, Bigley MB, Bushardt RL, Garr DR, Johnson K, Lang W, Maeshiro R, Meyer SM, Shannon SC, Spolsky VW, Stanley JM. The roles of healthcare professionals in implementing clinical prevention and population health. Am J Prev Med. 2011 Feb;40(2):261-7.
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loera, julie
Julie Loera, MPA 
Food Safety Officer, Consumer Protection Division, DSHS

cantu, vennessa
Venessa Cantu, MPH
Epidemiologist, Division for Disease Control and Prevention, DSHS

broussard, jane
Jane M Broussard, MS
Emergency Response CoordinatorU.S. Food and Drug Administration

 Foodborne Illness Investigations in Texas: Keeping Food “Safe for Our Plates” (3)

Foodborne Illness Investigations in Texas: Keeping Food “Safe for Our Plates” 

Presenters:
Julie Loera, MPA 
Food Safety Officer, Consumer Protection Division, DSHS
Venessa Cantu, MPH
Epidemiologist, Division for Disease Control and Prevention, DSHS 
Jane M Broussard, MS
Emergency Response Coordinator, U.S. Food and Drug Administration 

Description:
Each year, about 1 in 6 Americans – 48 million people – become ill from foodborne illness according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Illness severity can range from a few days of discomfort to very serious illness outbreaks leading to hospitalizations and even death. Trained teams of public health professionals are constantly working to identify, investigate and prevent foodborne illness in Texas as well as, across the nation. These teams include specialists from multiple disciplines (epidemiology, laboratory, and regulatory), and multiple agencies crossing over several levels of government (local, state, and federal). This presentation will examine and discuss case studies of foodborne illness in Texas.                     

Learning Objectives:

  • Recognize how foodborne illness outbreaks are detected and investigated in Texas.
  • Describe the multi-disciplinary, multi-agency, and multi-level (local, state, and federal) collaboration during outbreaks.
  • Discuss past foodborne outbreaks to demonstrate how investigation techniques and collaboration are critical for a successful outcome.

1.5 Continuing Education Credits/Contact Hours Available for the Following (live event only):

  • AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM
  • Continuing Nursing Education
  • Certified Health Education Specialists & Master-Certified Health Education Specialists 
  • Registered Dietitians
  • Registered Sanitarians
  • Social Workers

A certificate of attendance is available for those not seeking the credits/contact hours listed above.

Suggested Resources:

  1. Abanyie F, Harvey RR, Harris JR, et al. 2013 multistate outbreaks of Cyclospora cayetanensis infections associated with fresh produce: focus on the Texas investigations. Epidemiol Infect. 2015 Dec;143(16):3451-8. 
  2. Barton Behravesh C, Mody RK, Jungk J, et al. 2008 outbreak of Salmonella Saintpaul infections associated with raw produce. N Engl J Med. 2011 Mar 10;364(10):918-27. 
  3. Deng X, den Bakker HC, Hendriksen RS. Genomic Epidemiology: Whole-Genome-Sequencing-Powered Surveillance and Outbreak Investigation of Foodborne Bacterial Pathogens. Annu Rev Food Sci Technol. 2016;7:353-74. 
  4. Eppinger M, Cebula TA. Future perspectives, applications and challenges of genomic epidemiology studies for food-borne pathogens: A case study of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) of the O157:H7 serotype. Gut Microbes. 2015;6(3):194-201. 
  5. Gaul LK, Farag NH, Shim T, Kingsley MA, Silk BJ, Hyytia-Trees E. Hospital-acquired listeriosis outbreak caused by contaminated diced celery--Texas, 2010. Clin Infect Dis. 2013 Jan;56(1):20-6.
  6. Gaul L, Hellerstedt J. Typhoid Fever on the Half Shell. Tex Med. 2017 Feb 1;113(2):39-41.
  7. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. List of Selected Multistate Foodborne Outbreak Investigations. https://www.cdc.gov/foodsafety/outbreaks/multistate-outbreaks/outbreaks-list.html
  8. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Surveillance for Foodborne Disease Outbreaks, United States, 2014, Annual Report. Atlanta, GA : US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC, 2016
  9. Crowe SJ, Mahon BE, Vieira AR, Gould LH. Vital Signs: Multistate Foodborne Outbreaks - United States, 2010-2014. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2015 Nov 6;64(43):1221-5
  10. U.S. Food & Drug Administration. Outbreak Investigations. https://www.fda.gov/Food/RecallsOutbreaksEmergencies/Outbreaks/ucm272351.htm
  11. U.S. Food & Drug Administration. Rapid Response Teams (RRTs) https://www.fda.gov/forfederalstateandlocalofficials/programsinitiatives/ucm475021.htm

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 cance, jessica final
Jessica Duncan Cance, MPH, PhD

Substance Abuse Prevention Program Specialist, Child and Adolescent Services, Texas Health and Human Services Commission

strey, kasey (2)
Kasey Strey, ACPS, SPF-Rx 
Project Director and Substance Abuse Prevention Program Specialist, Texas Health and Human Services Commission 

 Preventing Opioid Misuse

register now red FINAL(1)

Preventing Opioid Misuse: A Public Health Approach 

Presenters:
Jessica Duncan Cance, MPH, PhD

Substance Abuse Prevention Program Specialist, Child and Adolescent Services, Texas Health and Human Services Commission
Kasey Strey, ACPS, SPF-Rx
Project Director and Substance Abuse Prevention Program Specialist, Texas Health and Human Services Commission 

Description:
This presentation will provide participants with an overview of HHSC-funded opioid misuse prevention activities. The presenters will discuss the epidemiology of opioid misuse in Texas and evidence-based prevention activities. Participants will be encouraged to identify strategies they can employ to prevent the misuse of opioids throughout Texas.                     

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe current trends in opioid misuse nationally and in Texas
  • Define the role of primary prevention in the opioid crisis 
  • Discuss evidence-based strategies designed to prevent opioid use and misuse 

1.5 Continuing Education Credits/Contact Hours Available for the Following (live event only):

  • AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM
  • Continuing Nursing Education
  • Certified Health Education Specialists & Master-Certified Health Education Specialists 
  • Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselors
  • Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists
  • Licensed Professional Counselors 
  • Licensed Psychologists
  • Registered Sanitarians
  • Social Workers

A certificate of attendance is available for those not seeking the credits/contact hours listed above.

Suggested Resources:

  1. Deandrea DC, Troost JP, Anthony JC. Toward primary prevention of extra-medical OxyContin® use among young people. Prev Med. 2013 Sep;57(3):244-6. 
  2. Dowell D, Haegerich TM, Chou R. CDC Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain--United States, 2016. JAMA. 2016 Apr 19;315(15):1624-45.
  3. Garland EL. Treating chronic pain: the need for non-opioid options. Expert Rev Clin Pharmacol. 2014 Sep;7(5):545-50. 
  4. Kolodny A, Courtwright DT, Hwang CS, et al. The prescription opioid and heroin crisis: a public health approach to an epidemic of addiction. Annu Rev Public Health. 2015 Mar 18;36:559-74. 
  5. Paulozzi LJ, Mack KA, Hockenberry JM; Division of Unintentional Injury Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, CDC. Vital signs: variation among States in prescribing of opioid pain relievers and benzodiazepines - United States, 2012. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2014 Jul 4;63(26):563-8.
  6. Prunuske JP, St Hill CA, Hager KD, et al. Opioid prescribing patterns for non-malignant chronic pain for rural versus non-rural US adults: a population-based study using 2010 NAMCS data. BMC Health Serv Res. 2014 Nov 19;14:563.
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dutton, rj 
RJ Dutton, PhD
Director, Office of Border Health, DSHS
 Public Health and the Texas-Mexico Border

register now red FINAL(1)

Public Health and the Texas-Mexico Border 
**In M653 Conference Room**

Presenter:
RJ Dutton, PhD
Director, Office of Border Health, DSHS

Description:
The 14 million people who live in the U.S.-Mexico border region share more than a border and a common heritage—both sides welcome the benefits of trade, but struggle with the pressure of growth. Sister cities along the border only seem separate, but they share the same air and the same destiny. The border population has been growing at almost twice the national rate and about a third of all U.S. tuberculosis cases are found in the four U.S. border states. The demographic profile of the border region presents both public health problems as well as    opportunities. The major historical milestones that define public health along the border, including the social determinants of health and key health disparities, will be discussed in this presentation.                     

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify and interpret major historical milestones impacting public health along the Texas-Mexico border.
  • Describe the social determinants of health and interpret border health disparities along the Texas-Mexico border.
  • Define and evaluate emerging public health issues along the Texas-Mexico border (e.g., obesity, diabetes, and mosquito borne diseases such as Zika).

1.5 Continuing Education Credits/Contact Hours Available for the Following (live event only):

  • AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM
  • Continuing Nursing Education
  • Certified Health Education Specialists & Master-Certified Health Education Specialists
  • Registered Sanitarians
  • Social Workers

A certificate of attendance is available for those not seeking the credits/contact hours listed above.

Suggested Resources:

  1. Ayala C, Fang J, Escobedo L, et al. Actions to control high blood pressure among hypertensive adults in Texas counties along the Mexico border: Texas BRFSS, 2007. Public Health Rep. 2012 Mar-Apr;127(2):173-85.
  2. Casey RP, Rouff MA, Jauregui-Covarrubias L. Diabetes among Latinos in the Southwestern United States: border health and binational cooperation. Rev Panam Salud Publica. 2014 Dec;36(6):391-5.
  3. Ghaddar S, Brown CJ, Pagan JA, Diaz V. Acculturation and healthy lifestyle habits among Hispanics in United States-Mexico border communities. Rev Panam Salud Publica. 2010 Sep;28(3):190-7.
  4. Reininger BM, Barroso CS, Mitchell-Bennett L, et al. Socio-ecological influences on health-care access and navigation among persons of Mexican descent living on the U.S./Mexico border. J Immigr Minor Health. 2014 Apr;16(2):218-28. 
  5. Salinas JJ, Su D, Al Snih S. Border health in the shadow of the Hispanic paradox: issues in the conceptualization of health disparities in older Mexican Americans living in the Southwest. J Cross Cult Gerontol. 2013 Sep;28(3):251-66. 
  6. Su D, Richardson C, Wen M, Pagan JA. Cross-border utilization of health care: evidence from a population-based study in south Texas. Health Serv Res. 2011 Jun;46(3):859-76.
  7. Zuniga JA, Munoz SE, Johnson MZ, Garcia A. Tuberculosis treatment for Mexican Americans living on the U.S.-Mexico border. J Nurs Scholarsh. 2014 Jul;46(4):253-62.
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fairchild, amy 
Amy Fairchild, PhD
Associate Dean of Academic Affairs/Professor, Texas A&M University, School of Public Health
 Ethical Issues in Public Health Surveillance: Understanding and Applying the World Health Organization (WHO) Guidelines

register now red FINAL(1)

Ethical Issues in Public Health Surveillance: Understanding and Applying the World Health Organization (WHO) Guidelines 

Presenter:
Amy Fairchild, PhD
Associate Dean of Academic Affairs/Professor, Texas A&M University, School of Public Health 

Description:
Public health surveillance is a powerful tool for fighting disease outbreaks and identifying various other health risks. Without knowing some basics, such as who has a disease and where are they located, it becomes nearly impossible to intervene. However, public health surveillance often raises concerns about privacy and civil liberties. In June, 2017, the World Health Organization (WHO) issued the first international ethics guidelines on public health surveillance. Amy Fairchild, PhD, MPH, associate dean of academic affairs at the Texas A&M School of Public Health and professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management, played a lead role in guiding a committee of international experts to produce these guidelines. Please join Dr. Fairchild for a discussion of the ethical considerations including interesting case studies.                     

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify core principles of public health ethics (as distinct from bioethics or human rights).
  • Discuss international ethical guidelines for public health surveillance.
  • Apply ethical principles and guidelines to challenges in public health surveillance. 

1.5 Continuing Education Credits/Contact Hours Available for the Following (live event only):

  • AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM
  • Continuing Nursing Education
  • Certified Health Education Specialists & Master-Certified Health Education Specialists
  • Registered Sanitarians
  • Social Workers 
  • Ethics credit awarded

A certificate of attendance is available for those not seeking the credits/contact hours listed above.

Suggested Pre-reading:
WHO Guidelines on Ethical Issues in Public Health Surveillance

Suggested Resources:

  1. Carter SM, Kerridge I, Sainsbury P, Letts JK. Public health ethics: informing better public health practice. N S W Public Health Bull. 2012 May-Jun;23(5-6):101-6. 
  2. Donovan GK. Ebola, epidemics, and ethics - what we have learned. Philos Ethics Humanit Med. 2014 Oct 24;9:15. 
  3. Hanlon P, Carlisle S, Hannah M, Lyon A, Reilly D. A perspective on the future public health: an integrative and ecological framework. Perspect Public Health. 2012 Nov;132(6):313-9. 
  4. Kangasniemi M, Vaismoradi M, Jasper M, Turunen H. Ethical issues in patient safety: Implications for nursing management. Nurs Ethics. 2013 Dec;20(8):904-16. 
  5. Swain GR, Burns KA, Etkind P. Preparedness: medical ethics versus public health ethics. J Public Health Manag Pract. 2008 Jul-Aug;14(4):354-7.
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lopez, molly 
Molly Lopez, PhD
Director, Texas Institute for Excellence in Mental Health, Center for Social Work Research, University of Texas at Austin
 Understanding Childhood Traumatic Stress in the Wake of Hurricane Harvey

register now red FINAL(1)

Understanding Childhood Traumatic Stress in the Wake of Hurricane Harvey 

Presenter:
Molly Lopez, PhD
Director, Texas Institute for Excellence in Mental Health, Center for Social Work Research, University of Texas at Austin

Description:
In August 2017, Hurricane Harvey brought high winds and torrential rainfall to the Gulf Coast, Houston, and East Texas regions of the state. As communities begin the work of recovery, what impact can we expect to see on the mental health of children and adolescents impacted by the storm? The experience of traumatic events, which disrupt a child’s sense of safety and stability, can have long-lasting impacts on well-being.

This presentation will examine current research, as it helps to identify those youth with the greatest risk for post-traumatic stress and other mental health conditions following trauma exposure. What lessons can be learned from the efforts to respond to child trauma exposure following 9/11, Hurricanes Katrina, Ike and Sandy? The presentation will examine public health approaches to addressing the needs of children impacted by this exposure and the role of health care, schools, and other child-serving systems.                     

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the inherently complex experience of traumatic events for children, their families and the broader caregiving systems. 
  • Examine lessons learned from previous natural and man-made disasters for public health responses to child traumatic stress. 
  • Discuss the role of public health and health care providers in mitigating the negative impact of trauma exposure on children.

1.5 Continuing Education Credits/Contact Hours Available for the Following (live event only):

  • AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM
  • Continuing Nursing Education
  • Certified Health Education Specialists & Master-Certified Health Education Specialists
  • Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists
  • Licensed Professional Counselors
  • Licensed Psychologists
  • Registered Sanitarians
  • Social Workers

A certificate of attendance is available for those not seeking the credits/contact hours listed above.

Suggested Resources:

  1. La Greca AM, Lai BS, Joormann J, Auslander BB, Short MA. Children's risk and resilience following a natural disaster: genetic vulnerability, posttraumatic stress, and depression. J Affect Disord. 2013 Dec;151(3):860-7. 
  2. Mace SE, Sharieff G, Bern A, et al. Pediatric issues in disaster management, part 3: special healthcare needs patients and mental health issues. Am J Disaster Med. 2010 Sep-Oct;5(5):261-74. 
  3. Murray JS. Responding to the psychosocial needs of children and families in disasters. Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am. 2010 Dec;22(4):481-91.
  4. Osofsky JD, Osofsky HJ, Weems CF, King LS, Hansel TC. Trajectories of post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms among youth exposed to both natural and technological disasters. J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2015 Dec;56(12):1347-55. 
  5. Vernberg EM, Hambrick EP, Cho B, Hendrickson ML. Positive Psychology and Disaster Mental Health: Strategies for Working with Children and Adolescents. J Clin Psychol. 2016 Dec;72(12):1333-1347.
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Last updated October 12, 2017